Bryan Fuller on female characters in season 3:   There’s criticism as well as there are accolades. If you’re opening yourself up you have to be open to both of them. It’s interesting to see reactions to certain female characters in the second season. And so going into the third season it’s like, “OK, Bedelia’s gotta be front and centre, we’ve gotta bring Murasaki in and she’s going to be a powerhouse with a lot to do.” And our agenda really was how do we make these characters drive their own stories as opposed to…    You know, Alana Bloom is not going to be a caregiver. We saw that in the first season and we saw her as a romantic foil… even though Caroline was not complaining about the scenes she had with Mads partially clothed! But I felt like going into this third season our first discussion in the writer’s room was; “We have to make Alana Bloom the most interesting character on the show.” Because she hasn’t been up until this point, and she’s served her role in the story between Hannibal and Will Graham.    Now going into season 3, we have the opportunity to change everybody as they’ve gone through this experience and take advantage of that. And it’s exciting because I’m excited to see what Caroline does, I’m excited to see what Gillian does, we’re bringing Gina Torres back, I can’t wait to find out who we cast for Murasaki. [x]

  Bryan Fuller on female characters in season 3:
   There’s criticism as well as there are accolades. If you’re opening yourself up you have to be open to both of them. It’s interesting to see reactions to certain female characters in the second season. And so going into the third season it’s like, “OK, Bedelia’s gotta be front and centre, we’ve gotta bring Murasaki in and she’s going to be a powerhouse with a lot to do.” And our agenda really was how do we make these characters drive their own stories as opposed to…
    You know, Alana Bloom is not going to be a caregiver. We saw that in the first season and we saw her as a romantic foil… even though Caroline was not complaining about the scenes she had with Mads partially clothed! But I felt like going into this third season our first discussion in the writer’s room was; “We have to make Alana Bloom the most interesting character on the show.” Because she hasn’t been up until this point, and she’s served her role in the story between Hannibal and Will Graham.
    Now going into season 3, we have the opportunity to change everybody as they’ve gone through this experience and take advantage of that. And it’s exciting because I’m excited to see what Caroline does, I’m excited to see what Gillian does, we’re bringing Gina Torres back, I can’t wait to find out who we cast for Murasaki. [x]

(Source: mikkelsenpai, via hellotailor)

punkabed:

look, if you’re gonna talk about autistic representation, don’t just talk about nine year old white boys who memorize train schedules and plane models and can recite like 500 digits of pi. talk about the chubby filipino girl who’s terrified to speak up in class but can talk for hours about welcome to night vale. talk about the bigender indian person with pdd-nos who found out about asl and felt a weight lift off their chest. talk about the newly diagnosed black man who was always told he was just lazy, unmotivated, a burden.

neurodiversity is important, but diversity within that community is even more important.

(Source: pxnkabed, via fuckitfireeverything)

dramatisecho:

partially-deceased feature // simon monroe

"I balanced all, brought all to mind,The years to come seemed waste of breath,A waste of breath the years behindIn balance with this life, this death.”

dramatisecho:

partially-deceased feature // simon monroe

"I balanced all, brought all to mind,
The years to come seemed waste of breath,
A waste of breath the years behind
In balance with this life, this death.”

(via monroesimon)

kenobi-wan-obi:

qiaooooo:

omg everyone, “white tears: the book” exists.

a must have

kenobi-wan-obi:

qiaooooo:

omg everyone, “white tears: the book” exists.

a must have

(Source: eriqalikesthis, via pauldierden)

"I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged."

fakespacegirl:

Hate doesn’t breed hate. Hate inspires anger in victims of hatred and that anger is called hatred to delegitimize it and villainize people. If you wanna help people who are victims then first you gotta stop acting like they’re just as bad their oppressors and abusers.

(via aka14kgold)

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

(via whoistorule)

jhameia:

driftingfocus:

anogoodrabblerouser:

disquietingtruths:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Robert Sapolsky about his study of the Keekorok baboon troop from National Geographic’s Stress: Portrait of a Killer.

Thiiiiiiis, people, thiiiis!

1. Kill alpha male types
2. Achieve world peace

Got it.

I’ve actually read a lot of Sapolsky’s work.  He’s one of my favorite scientists in the neuro/socio world.

I just watched the documentary and there is so much more about the troop that isn’t in this photoset—not only does the troop have a culture of little aggression and greater cooperation, but any incoming jerk baboons learned within a few months that their shitty behaviour was in no way acceptable, that the troop only rewarded sociability, and they changed accordingly. 

If effin’ baboons can learn this there’s pretty much no reason to believe that our only option in dealing with assholes is to just ignore their behaviour and let it continue.

(via luchia13)

"everything decent is influenced by bowie, so i am going to be THE MOST influenced by bowie"

onyourproperty on twitter.

she was talking about gerard way but I’m adopting it as personal motto asap

(via tobreakandblossom)

yeah pretty much

(via byzantienne)

becausebirds:

An amethyst in bird-form, meet the Costa’s Hummingbird. A desert hummingbird, Costa’s Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona.

becausebirds:

An amethyst in bird-form, meet the Costa’s Hummingbird. A desert hummingbird, Costa’s Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona.

(via 148km)